Load YouTube Videos Quicker In Firefox

By on July 31, 2010.     1 Comment

A feature introduced in Firefox 2 called Session Restore can actually be slowing down the load times of Flash videos, like those found on YouTube and Daily Motion. The feature creates a “save point” every 10 seconds, so you can return back to where you were in case of a browser crash. If you’re loading a Flash video (as most video sites use these days) or running multiple tabs, this can noticeably impact load times.

You can extend the duration between “save points” via the Firefox configuration page. In the address bar, type in about:config and press ENTER. If this is your first time viewing the configuration page, you’ll see a warning that says “This might void your warranty!” Firefox doesn’t actually come with a warranty, but the developers want you to be careful with modifying other settings on that page. Making a mistake can mess up the browser. Click the button that says “I’ll be careful.”

A large list of options will now display. In the Filter text-box, type in browser.sessionstore.interval to shorten the list of options.

The default value for the session store interval is in milliseconds at 10000 (10 seconds). Double-click the value and change it to a longer period of time, say 1 minute (60000 milliseconds) or 5 minutes (300000 milliseconds). The preference will become bold to signify a modification.

Restart your Firefox web browser and then try loading some Flash videos from your favorite site. Don’t expect lighting speed load times, but now you’ve got one less thing slowing you down.

Posted in: Web Browsers



is the site owner of Computer Tech Tips and is passionate about computer technology, particularly Windows-based software, malware removal, and web development. He enjoys helping people troubleshoot computer problems and providing technical support to family, friends, and people around the net. Xps wrote 79 article(s) for Computer Tech Tips.


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